Energy Audits: Is Your Building in Top Shape?

The North Alabama Buildings Performance Challenge is up and running, which means it’s time to start conserving energy. If you’ve signed up for the challenge, you’ve committed your company to attaining 20% energy savings in your building within 10 years.

Today, we’re continuing our three-part series about the primary steps that facility owners should take in order to achieve that target. By the time you finish all three posts, you should have learned a good bit of the info you’ll need to craft your energy-saving strategy.

Last time, we looked at energy benchmarking, and next time we’ll discuss commissioning. Today, though, the topic is energy audits.

An energy audit, to quote Energy.gov’s rather straightforward definition, is “a survey that shows how much energy you use in your house or apartment. It will help you find ways to use less energy.”

For our purposes, let’s just pretend they didn’t limit their explanation to houses and apartments. Whether the building is a home, business, factory, corporate headquarters or something else entirely, the concept remains the same. By giving your building an energy audit, you’ll be assessing how much energy it uses. And with that information in hand, you’ll know what measures you can take in order to use less energy and make your building more efficient.

Energy Audits vs. Benchmarking

Simple, right?Energy Audit

Now, at this point, you might be thinking that this sounds a whole lot like benchmarking, the topic of the previous entry in this series. The two concepts are indeed similar, but there’s a key difference.

Benchmarking compares your building to similar facilities in order to give you an idea of where it stands in relation to its peers. An energy audit goes one step further and sets out a plan for action.

Or, to use a fitness metaphor, benchmarking only tells you how overweight your building is. An energy audit analyzes your building’s energy usage and gives it a customized workout plan. By following the plan, you’ll whip your building into shape in no time.

Saving Money

And once your building’s energy consumption is on track, you’ll start saving money on your utility bill. How much money? According to the U.S. Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Challenge, our national model, most companies can easily capture 20% energy savings. When we say easily, we mean that most businesses can see these kinds of savings with minimal effort and investment.

That kind of reduction to your energy bill would set you on course to conquer the North Alabama Buildings Performance Challenge. Plus, it would pretty much make you a rockstar at your company.

So, then, what does an energy audit look like?

In residential settings, weatherproofing and insulation are generally two big areas of concern. For industrial or commercial buildings, audits would be more likely to focus on production equipment, lighting or climate control. In either case, you’ll want to find a professional to conduct the audit for you.

What Will This Cost?

Of course, some of this may come at a cost. Preliminary energy audits, or PEAs, and (usually) Level I audits can be done for free if you proceed with upgrade work–or at least at a very low cost. For more detailed audits the cost will be a little higher.

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory estimates that detailed energy audits generally run between $0.12 and $0.50 per square foot. We call these Level II or Level III audits. For a great rundown on the difference between the different types of audits, check out this article from Microgrid Energy.

Depending on the size of your facility, that can amount to a serious chunk of change. But it’s not all bad news, as PNNL notes:

A convention center in a major metropolitan city reduced energy costs by almost $80,000 annually by implementing energy efficient changes to equipment, controls and system. Payback for these changes was less than a year, and facility staff predict an additional savings of $174,000 annually if longer-term equipment replacements are installed.

Those figures represent savings that virtually any company could appreciate. And it all came about because of energy auditing.

Naturally, no two auditing experiences will be exactly alike. But in almost every case, you should be able to find ways to increase efficiency–and save money.

With that, you’re ready to take the plunge with an energy audit. Up next, it’s time to talk about commission. See you then.